A search for peace among war

51pf6phqmrlPax, by Sara Pennypacker (2016)

Opening line: “The fox felt the car slow before the boy did, as he felt everything first.”

Get ready for a heart-breaker, friends.

Years ago, while playing in the woods, Peter stumbled across a dead mother fox and her litter of pups, all but one of whom were also dead. The tiniest one was somehow surviving, and Peter brought him home and named him Pax. Since that moment, the two, boy and fox, were inseparable. But now war is upon them, and Peter’s father is joining the effort, meaning that Peter must go live with his grandfather, where Pax is not allowed. Heartbroken, but seeing no other option, he releases him into the wild, where he hopes he will be safe. Pax, of course, doesn’t understand, and plans to wait until his boy returns. But when hunger sets in and danger lurks, that plan isn’t quite so easy.

Meanwhile, the moment Peter arrives at his grandfather’s, he knows he made a mistake leaving Pax behind. He will know no peace until he finds Pax again. So he sets out in the middle of the night, planning to hike the couple hundred miles back to where he left his fox. As you might imagine, things go array pretty quickly.

The chapters switch back and forth between Peter’s story and Pax’s, as both are desperate to reunite with the other. The alternating perspectives spur the story forward, allowing the reader to feel that desperation as well. Those who loved One and Only Ivan will love Pax as well, and it is well-deserving of its spot on the NBA Young People’s Literature longlist for 2016.

2 stars

 

 

The Mountain calls.

61fvtvw74elThe Honest Truth, by Dan Gemeinhart (2015)

Opening Line: “The mountain was calling me.”

I mean, I get it. One of the best things about my new living situation is that when I turn a corner I might get surprised by a sudden mountain view. And the mountain this opening line is specifically about, Mt. Rainier, is particularly noteworthy. I vividly remember the time my family went on perhaps the greatest roadtrip vacation ever, along the northern west coast, and had been at Mt. Rainier National Park all day without seeing the actual mountain because of clouds, and then, on our way out, we came around a bend and THERE IT WAS IN ALL ITS MAGICAL GLORY.

rainier

I mean, you see those “mountains” down at the bottom? That’s what we thought were the mountains before this bad boy came into view.

So, I get it. The mountain calls to me too. Not that I’m going to try to climb it, like Mark does in The Honest Truth.

Mark is a normal kid. As normal as a kid who has been through multiple cancer treatments, beating the odds, can be. But now the cancer is back. And Mark is out of options.

More than anything, Mark wants to follow his grandfather’s dreams of climbing Mt. Rainier, but he knows his parents will never let him with his current diagnosis. And so, he sets off on his own, with just his beloved dog Beau, telling no one — with the exception of leaving a secret haiku for his best friend Jess.

While Jess struggles with whether to tell Mark’s parents where she’s pretty sure he went, Mark journeys across state lines with little Beau. Despite his well-orchestrated plans, things go awry, and the trip is much more difficult than Mark imagined. Still, his determination will stop at nothing to reach the summit.

This story is raw and honest and the reader feels the desperation Mark feels along the way. If you have readers like I do that “want something that’s going to make me cry”, suggest this. You will never feel sorry for Mark, but you will definitely feel for him (and bff Jess, unsure of what she should do to save her friend).

All heart, this one. 2 stars.

 

It’s a mad, mad, mad, mad cow world

Going Bovine, by Libba Bray (2009)

Opening line: “The best day of my life happened when I was five and almost died at Disney World.”

Oh boy, this book. Where to begin.

I guess let’s begin with a summary. Cameron is your average dissatisfied high schooler, just trying to get by with the minimal effort. His parents and twin sister seem uninteretsed and disconnected, and Cam isn’t motivated to fix anything, until he gets a serious health diagnosis: Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease, more commonly known as “mad-cow disease.” This perfectly sums up the contradictions of this book. It’s a whirlwind combination of perfectly mundane ordinary high school personalities and reactions, mixed with the absurd. I mean, really, who gets mad-cow disease?? Then things get weirder. Cam starts having what he’s sure are hallucinations, involving a pink-haired punk angel named Dulcie, fire giants that are hunting him, and a speaking garden gnome. Dulcie convinces Cam to go on a wild journey to find Dr. X, the only person who can cure him. He must also bring along a kid from school, a hypochondriac dwarf named Gonzo. Cameron decides he has nothing to lose, so off they go.

The whole story supposedly parallels Don Quixote (although I don’t remember much from when we read it in Spanish senior year), which Cameron is reading at school before his diagnosis. It’s an epic roadtrip novel, a journey of self-discovery, mixed with the super weird. I don’t know. It has great elements and hilarious characters, but something about it… I had a really hard time getting into it and then also finishing it. After listening to the whole first section of my audiobook, I realized I had already started listening to it the year before, but had moved on to something else. I’m trying to figure out why it was awarded the Printz, because they usually know what they’re talking about, but I’m just not sure. I think most teens wouldn’t hold out for the whole thing, as I didn’t the first time around. I think it’s just a little too off the rocker for me to connect with. Those fire giants, man.

Anyway, I did finish it eventually, although I had to renew it (which I hardly ever do with audiobooks). Maybe I’m not a huge Libba Bray fan. This is the third Libba book I read (Great and Terrible Beauty and Beauty Queens), and for both of them I thought I would like them more than I actually did. (Beauty Queens was the best of the three, though.) I’m still holding out hope for The Diviners, though, because it looks real good.

1 star