Most Anticipated 2018 TBRs!

2018 Most Anticipated TBRs!.png

If you’re like me, your TBR list is multiple pages long, your bookshelves are bursting at the seams, you have holds on several different things on hold through inter-library loan, and yet you still have the same argument with yourself every time you pass a bookstore, or the library, or need to buy something on Amazon: do you really need more books? YES. THE ANSWER IS ALWAYS YES.

So here are some books to add to your Amazon cart or GoodReads list that I’m particularly looking forward to this year.

cover_imageEscape from Aleppo, by N. H. Senzai (Release date: January 2)

Nadia’s 12th birthday marks the beginning of the Arab Spring with a horrific protest in Tunisia, and three years later, her family has decided they need to leave their home in Syria, which is now in the middle of a civil war, for a safer location. But amidst the bombing, she gets separated from her family and has to rely on her on ingenuity to get her to the safety of the Turkish border and find her family again. Students (and adults) need more stories like these to help make sense of all the very real horror happening in that part of the world.

cover_imageThe Altered History of Willow Sparks, by Tara O’Connor (release date: January 30)

I love a good standalone graphic novel, and this one sounds right up my alley. When the main character is described as having “uncool hair and unfortunate acne” and works parttime at the local library, I’m immediately like, I feel you. While working at said library, Willow Sparks uncovers a book with her name on it, and she discovers that writing in the book changes her future (like actually, not in a metaphoric sense). Exciting at first, until Willow realizes her rewrites can have dire consequences.

cover_imagePlaying Atari with Saddam Hussein, by Jennifer Roy (release date: February 6)

Based on the true story of Ali Fadhil, who was 11 in 1991 when the U.S. invaded Iraq in Operation Desert Storm. While most of our students have memory (or at least a frame of reference) for the ongoing “War on Terror” in Iraq, this earlier conflict is largely unknown to them. Heck, it’s largely unknown to me. I was three at the time. In this story readers will get a glimpse into the simultaneous mundane aspects and devastation of war through the eyes of a boy who lived it.

cover_imageThe Prince and the Dressmaker, by Jen Wang (release date: February 13)

While Prince Sebastian’s parents are busy finding him a future bride, Sebastian and his best friend, dressmaker Frances, know the truth: at night, Sebastian likes to put on dresses and take to the streets of Paris as Lady Crystallia. The SLJ review suggests this is a good step up for fans of Raina Telgemeier’s and Victoria Jamieson’s, and I have plenty of fans of both those ladies. Super excited for this one.

 

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The Serpent’s Secret, by Sayantani Dasgupta (release date: February 27)

My students cannot seem to get enough of modern heroes battling ancient mythological beasts, and here we have a new diverse character coming to the table. 12 year old Kiranmala thinks she’s just a normal 6th grader living in New Jersey, until one morning her parents disappear and she suddenly encounters an ancient demon in her living room. It appears as if her family’s old Bengali stories might just in fact be true…

cover_imageThe Night Diary, by Veera Hiranandani (release date: March 6)

I’ve been perhaps disproportionately interested in Indian literature since taking an Indian Lit class my sophomore year of college, but I just can’t get enough of them. I have nearly an entire shelf of adult Indian lit at home, but rarely is there middle grade or YA published that is set in this country. I was thrilled to see this one come up. Written as letters to her mother (who died when she was a baby), this middle grade novel tells the story of 12 year old Nisha during the tumultuous year of 1947, when India was divided into two countries based on religion. Nisha has to come to terms with what it means to be “home”, as her family embarks on a journey to what they hope will be a peaceful future.

cover_imageThe Creativity Project, edited by Colby Sharp (release date: March 13)

I follow Colby on Twitter, so when he first started talking about this one, I was immediately intrigued.  The basic premise is that Colby invited more than 40 authors/illustrators/creators to write story prompts, those prompts were swapped, and magical creativity ensued! This is the collection of all the projects developed from those prompts, including work from some of our favorite people: Sherman Alexie, Kate DiCamillo, Peter Brown, R.J. Palacio, Laurel Snyder, gah, I could go on and on, because there are SO MANY great contributors to this!!!

34219841The Wild Robot Escapes, by Peter Brown (release date: March 13)

I looovvvved the The Wild Robot when I read it this summer, and am so excited for the second addition to Roz’s story. I anticipate more sweet drawings and more charming interactions from the characters in the sequel. This one picks up where the other left off, so if you haven’t read the first one, check that one out first!

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Ghost Boys, by Jewell Parker Rhodes (release date: April 17)

We’ve gotten All American BoysThe Hate U Give, Dear Martin, and others from the YA community in response to the increase of police shootings of brown skinned people, and now Rhodes gives that response for the younger set in this middle grade novel about 12 year old Jerome, who is shot and killed when a police officer mistakes his toy gun for a real gun. Jerome’s ghost meets the ghost of Emmitt Till, another young victim of racial violence, who helps him process the fallout of what happened to him.

36301023My Plain Jane, by Cynthia Hand, Jodi Meadows, and Brodi Ashton (release date: June 26)

I thoroughly enjoyed last year’s My Lady Jane, so was excited to see another installment in the “the Lady Janies.” This one is a fantastical reimagining of a fictional character rather than a historical one, focusing on Bronte’s titular character, Jane Eyre. Having read the original not too long ago during grad school, I can’t wait to dig into this one where Jane is not only a governess, but also a ghost hunter. Yes, please.

Okay, so I could probably go on for quite a while on this list, but we gotta draw the line somewhere. What about you? What are the books you’re most looking forward to in 2018? How about last year’s list? Any that came out in 2017 that you still are dying to get to? I have plenty of those as well. If authors could just stop writing for like 10 to 12 years so I could catch up, that would be great. (JUST KIDDING, NEVERMIND, PLEASE DON’T STOP.)

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Frenemies, besties, and pals

31145178Real Friends, by Shannon Hale and LeUyen Pham (2017)

Opening line: “When I was little, I didn’t worry about friends.”

Guess what, guys? I found another one to hand to those students who have Raina Telgemeier’s books on constant rotation! A couple years ago I added El Deafo, last year I added Roller Girl, and now we have Real Friends!

This graphic memoir tells the story of Shannon Hale’s elementary years and her difficulty establishing valuable friendships. From the popular girl who is the leader of “The Group” to the girl she meets when crying in the bushes, young Shannon navigates the tricky waters of figuring out what makes a good friend and how to be a good friend. Through a lot of bumps and emotional bruises, Shannon learns that real friends help you to become the best version of yourself. Super relateable and helpful for those younger middle graders battling the same struggles.

2 stars

MG GNs Roundup

Summertime is always the time when I catch up on stuff that I’ve bought for school over the past year that I’ve been meaning to read, but haven’t gotten the chance, and graphic novels tend to be a huge part of that. I have really prioritized building my school library’s graphic novel section since I got there two years ago, because when I arrived, the graphic novels were still lost on a lone shelf in the 741 section of the non-fiction, where they couldn’t be found or loved. Now, the two bays I dedicated for them when I arrived are bursting at the seams (once I got them all returned at the end of the year), and although about half of them are circulating at any given time, I’m starting to eye some other areas where I can expand even more. This spring I specifically targeted the manga collection (Japanese comics) and the kids were so excited. I’ll definitely be buying more of those this year.

In any case, here’s a selection of some of the MG GNs (middle grade graphic novels, for those of you not deeply rooted in library land) I’ve been catching up on this summer:

 

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Ghosts, by Raina Telgemeier (2016)

I definitely had to wait for summer to read this one, because ever since I bought three copies of it for the library, it hasn’t stayed on the shelf for more than 24 hours (you think I’m exaggerating, but I’m not). Cat’s family had moved to northern CA, a climate better for her little sis’s cystic fibrosis, but this town seems to be a little too paranormal for Cat’s comfort level… As always, Raina’s colors are vibrant and sister relationships are spot on. Fun and quick. Not my favorite of Raina’s, but a sure hit with all her fans. 2 stars

Fish Girl, by David Wiesner and Donna Jo Napoli (2017)30971730

Obviously we all love David Wiesner’s picture books, right? I did a David Wiesner unit with third graders when I was student teaching, and we had a wonderful time dissecting all the illustrations to try to figure out what was going on. Now that he’s teamed up with veteran MG/YA author Donna Jo Napoli, we get a graphic novel that is a little more flushed out than his picture books, although it still leaves a lot of room for the imagination. Fish Girl tells the story of a young mermaid who lives in a boardwalk aquarium attraction with little to no memory of how she ended up there. When a curious visitor starts to connect to and communicate with her, Fish Girl starts to realize that there is a big world beyond her aquarium walls, and Neptune, the owner of the aquarium, is really more of a captor than a father figure. She must decide if she is able — and willing — to break free to live in an unknown world. 2 stars

30652105One Trick Pony, by Nathan Hale (2017)

Our students already known and love Nathan Hale from his Hazardous Tales history graphic novels. Now he brings them out of the past and into the future in this dystopian imagining of what our world will be like when the aliens invade, seeking out our energy sources and basically destroying our world in the process. (Although, let’s be honest, we won’t need aliens to mess up our energy sources. We’re quite capable of that all on our own.) Hale maintains his tradition of shades of gray with one color mixed in, which paints a fairly bleak picture of the future. But it’s also a fascinating one. The main character’s family is part of a caravan, constantly on the move to stay away from the aliens. This is because they are the protectors of all the digital information they’ve been able to gather, and their mission is to protect humankind’s history. I’m all about a kid’s sci-fi GN with the message of the value of information and our duty to protect it. 2.5 stars

The Nameless City, by Faith Erin Hicks (2016)25332000

Kai is a recent immigrant to the Nameless City, an ancient city under constant turbulence as neighboring empires attempt to control it and the waterways it’s connected to. Currently the Dao have control of the city, and have maintained relative peace for the last three decades. But no nation has kept control this long… it’s only a matter of time before war comes again. Kai, Dao born and bred, has moved to the city to finally meet his father and to train as a Dao soldier. But he’s not really interested in fighting. When out exploring the city one night, he meets Rat, a local who was born and raised in the streets, and is the fastest person he’s ever seen. As Rat begins to teach Kai how to run the rooftops, and their friendship blossoms, each realizes that maybe there’s no reason for the hate and resentment that has traditionally kept the tension boiling in the city — and it may be up to them to stop that tension from boiling over. Excited for the next installment! 2.5 stars

31159613Yvain: The Knight of the Lion, by M.T. Anderson and Andrea Offermann (2017)

This one is quite different than the others on the list, both in terms of style and audience. Again, we have a novelist and an illustrator teaming up to create their first graphic novel, and it is definitely unique. Here we have a graphic version of a great Arthurian epic, the tale of Yvain, a knight of Arthur’s round table and cousin to Sir Gawain. Yvain feels the need to prove himself as a young knight, and goes off to avenge another cousin, killing his enemy. The man he kills is the lord of a castle and keeper of a magical pond that causes horrific storms when anyone pours water on a stone at its the center. Of course, Yvain falls in love at first sight upon seeing the window of said enemy, and she is convinced to marry him in order to protect her townspeople and castle. Yvain, being the young dope he is, proceeds to cause all sorts of trouble before setting things “right” again. Okay, so it’s hard to summarize an epic poem in one paragraph, because craziness always ensues. In any case, this one leans more YA in content and style. The language is a bit tricky for younger readers and there’s lots of blood and gore (although artfully depicted). I think it will be a tougher sell for my students, but kids interested in medieval settings may enjoy it. 1.5 stars

That’s a wrap for now! I’m sure I’ll have more graphics to review before too long…

 

A Light in the Darkness

29436571March: Book Three, by John Lewis, and Andrew Aydin, art by Nate Powell (2016)

I don’t know that I’ve ever seen a book on Goodreads with a higher rating than this one (4.7/5 stars), but that’s not why I read the conclusion to John Lewis’ March trilogy this weekend. It’s been a while since I’ve seen a book win so many awards, (4 at ALA’s Youth Media Awards announced last week and the National Book Award last year) but that wasn’t why I read it either.

I read it because I needed some hope.

When earlier this week, I opened a new box of books at school, I breathed a sigh of relief to find March among them. It’s been a rough week, hasn’t it? It’s hard to not feel hopeless every time I turn on the news or scroll through my social media feeds, and after getting a little less sleep than normal due to my husband’s knee surgery on Monday, by this weekend, I was feeling weighed down. Hearing from one of our country’s leading civil rights activists who has really been through it all, that’s what I needed.

If you’ve read the first two volumes of March, you know what to expect in this one. The third volume picks up with the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham in September 1963, when four young girls died and dozens more were injured. It then carries through the assassinations of JFK and Malcolm X, the killings of the three civil rights workers in Mississippi, Freedom Summer (with the major push to register black voters in Alabama), and culminating with the marches in Selma. It’s a dark story, darker than the first two for sure. There were more than a few scenes that make my neck prickle at purchasing this for middle school.

But there’s no way I can let this one stay off the shelves. There’s too many important things in these pages, things that I don’t think my students are aware of. I know before reading the first March, I had very little knowledge of John Lewis and the incredible role he has played in our country’s history (and modern politics),  and I was raised in a much more diverse population. It seems as though we teach about MLK, Rosa Parks, maybe Malcolm X in more liberal classrooms, but that’s about the extent of it. The fact that Lewis chose to tell his story through graphic format is genius. Not only does it meet students where they are (in the graphic novel section), but also it brings the reality of the horror of our nation’s past to very bright light. And the thing is, it doesn’t take much to see how relevant this story from 50 years ago is in our current situation.

The thing that I think makes this book so powerful, though, is what I mentioned at the beginning: the hope. Lewis does not shy away from the violence, from the language, from the very real darkness he lived through. But interspersed with that darkness are scenes from Inauguration Day in 2009, when President Obama took office. These little glimpses show us that despite all the terror Lewis has witnessed, he knows the value, the purpose, the goal and that it’s all worth it. He knows that those terrible years in the 60s were just the beginning of a lifetime of hard struggle (as is evidenced in his 30 years in U.S. Congress so far), and yet he’s not giving up. He’ll keep doing the work, and so can we. As sad as I am that Obama is no longer in Washington, I can remain hopeful, because Lewis is. And even when he finally does take a well-deserved rest, there will be others there, maintaining the fight.

3 stars, Mr. Lewis.

Middle School Drama at its Finest

Awkward, by Svetlana Chmakova (2015)61yatzrvzjl

What a perfect title for this graphic novel set in middle school. Because, coming from someone who spends everyday in a middle school, it’s a word that describes anywhere from 50%-75% of any given day.

Penelope feels super awkward every time she sees Jaime in the hallways, due to a terrible interaction she had with him on her first day at a new school. After tripping over her own feet in front of everyone, Jaime stops to help her pick up her stuff. The local bullies start harassing them, calling Penelope Jaime’s “nerder girlfriend”, and in a desperate attempt to distance herself from a low social status, she pushes Jaime away and yells at him to leave her alone. Now she feels incredibly guilty for her reaction to a kid who was just trying to be nice to her.

Awkward.

I can identify with Penelope’s severe guilt complex (I still cringe when thinking of a similar moment of over-reaction in 5th grade), so I immediately felt the truth of these pages. Soon, she gets in with the art club crowd, a weird but welcoming group of friends — another thing I can identify with after spending four years in drama club. But the art club’s bitter rival is the science club, who recently stole their table at the school club fair, and the principal plans to cancel both clubs if they can’t get along. Penelope’s anxious to keep the art club running, because it’s the only place she’s felt comfortable — and the one person from the science club who might be willing to help bring the clubs together is none other than Jaime. Can she push aside the awkwardness to save the clubs?

I loved this graphic novel for it’s engaging artwork, complex and diverse characters, and simple yet relevant plot. Another good one to hand to those that love Raina T.

2 stars.

Holy Mae Jamison!

71aw5whc8el81cs5miglxlLumberjanes Vol. 1: Beware the Kitten Holy and Lumberjanes Vol. 2: Friendship to the Max  by Noelle Stevenson, Grace Ellis, and Brooke A. Allen (2015)

Oh my gosh, you guys. These GNs are the best.

Miss Qiunzilla Thiskwin Penniquiqul Thistle Crumpet’s Camp for Hardcore Lady-Types is the summer home for the five best friends in the Roanoke Cabin. Things are hunky dory with a variety of summer camp activities. That is until monsters show up. That’s basically the extent of this series… summer camp activities, friendship, and monster-fighting. And I couldn’t ask for more.

The dialogue is smart, hilarious, and perfectly pre-teen. The pro-feminist attitude and she-ro exclamations (“oh my Bessie Coleman!” “Where the Phyllis Wheatley were you?”) are perfection (even if they may be lost on a younger audience). AND it quietly references A League of their Own, only the greatest movie ever!

Seriously, these are so much fun and made me laugh out loud many times. 3 stars.

Strange, scary, swampy stories

618x1sxqvnlThe Dreadful Fate of Jonathan York, by Kory Merritt (2015)

Opening line: “Beware Pen-tip Polishers and Ditto Wranglers.”

What a delightfully weird book this is. Oh, how I loved it. Someone on Goodreads said it was as if Edgar Allan Poe, Dr. Seuss, and Tim Burton all sat down and wrote a book together, and Paperbackstash was right.

Jonathan York got himself lost in the swamp on his way home, and it’s getting dark. Of course, that means it’s getting a little too “Snow White in the creepy woods scene” for him, and he’s only all too happy when he happens upon three strangers who suggest he accompany them to a nearby inn. Luckily for Jonathan, the innkeepers don’t accept money as payment, only stories. Really good stories. Unfortunately for Jonathan, he’s terrified of public speaking and cannot think of a single story.

The strangers have some wild stories, indeed. But when it’s Jonathan’s turn, he’s kicked to the curb (or the dark, shadowy swamp) after failing to produce a story. And so begins the most wild story of his life.

The artwork, while sometimes SUPER creepy, also has lots of great and hilarious details. You can tell that this creator is just as much an artist as a storyteller. I also love that stories are the form of exchange here. That should be the case more often, right?

2.5 stars